global plan

GLOBAL SNOW LEOPARD ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION PLAN

Global Council

In 2012, the Kyrgyzstan Head of State initiated a Ministry-level effort to create a Global Snow Leopard Ecosystem Protection Plan, modeled on the 2010 Global Tiger Initiative.  Meetings were held in December 2012 and May 2013, attended by international NGOs including the Snow Leopard Conservancy and representatives of all twelve snow leopard range countries, for planning and development of key documents.  In October 2013, delegates met at the Kyrgyz State Residence, where the Global Initiative was endorsed and signed by every range country.

Participants set the goal of securing twenty landscape-level snow leopard populations by the year 2020.

This means that each population will have at least 100 breeding age snow leopards, will have been conserved with the involvement of local communities, support adequate and secure prey populations, and have functional connectivity to other snow leopard landscapes, some of which cross international boundaries. “Secure 20 by 2020” will lay the foundation to reach the ultimate goal: ensuring that snow leopards remain the living icon of mountains of Asia for generations to come.

Securing Snow Leopard Habitat
GLOBAL INITIATIVE 2020
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LAND OF THE SNOW LEOPARD NETWORK

In ancient times, big cats on every continent were sacred and central to the cultures of communities who shared their habitat. Respected, influential elders and healers/Shamans were the holders of indigenous knowledge and practice. They performed ceremonies to honor and celebrate these sacred animals as symbols of unity and sources of spiritual power, wisdom, and inspiration. Through 70 years of Soviet repression, these traditions were all but lost – from the pamphlet Land of the Snow Leopard Network

Buyanbadrakh calling in the spirits

Goals of the Land of the Snow Leopard Network:

  • Merging western and indigenous approaches to scientific knowledge

  • Establishing a precedent for Indigenous Cultural Practitioners (ICPs) to be co-equal partners in snow leopard conservation, standardize integration of relational world-views in such planning,

  • Revitalizing ancient ceremonies to remember and honor the snow leopard spirit as a unifier of humanity

  • Establishing sacred sites as education/interpretive centers for the spiritual and terrestrial ecology of snow leopards

  • Empowering cultural practitioners with new communication technologies, and building an online network

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